How Being a Motherless Daughter Helped Me Adapt to a COVID World

It is not the strongest of the species that survives, not the most intelligent. It is the one that is most adaptable to change. Charles Darwin, English naturalist, geologist and biologist

As an eight-year-old who suddenly found herself without a mother, I adapted. I got to know and love my dad, learned to accept my motherless status, became independent and resourceful. 

Like my early days as a motherless child, I was miserable during the first few weeks after my life was hijacked by COVID-19. I told myself, however, that because I had learned resilience and adaptability at an early age and beyond, I had the tools to adapt. I had faith that I would rebound and I did. 

Do I love staying at home, not seeing my kids and grands, not going to church, lunching with friends or eating food cooked by others? No! Have I adapted to my new-normal and found interesting and creative ways to “do” life? Yes! My early days of learning adaptability are serving me.

Affirmation: I know how to adapt to change.

Coaching questions: How are you adapting to the new-normal? How are your past life experiences serving you during this time? What have you learned? 

Photo by Evgeni Tcherkasski on Unsplash

7 thoughts on “How Being a Motherless Daughter Helped Me Adapt to a COVID World

  1. Really an excellent piece, Mershon!! Although I didn’t have your same experience of losing my mother so young, I have had a number of other situations that have helped me to be resilient through this pandemic. Thank you!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. That quote of What doesn’t kill us makes us stronger could be a comment on COVID-19. If it doesn’t kill us, it leaves behind antibodies that may protect us from further harm.

    Liked by 1 person

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